Lonsdale Railroad Accident – 1893

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The Evening Bulletin
Maysville, KY.
January 19, 1893

Evening Bulletin
Maysville, KY.
January 19, 1893

Evening Bulletin
(Maysville, KY.)
January 19, 1893

 

 

Smithfield’s Air-Line Railroad Newspaper Articles

    Air-Line Newspaper Articles from 1843 to 1893 

      The “Air-Line Railroad” became part of the Providence & Worcester Railroad. For a brief history, click here: Smithfield’s Air-Line Railroad

Click on articles to enlarge.

Woonsocket Patriot
December 22, 1843
Part 1

Woonsocket Patriot
December 22, 1843
Part 2

Woonsocket Patriot
December 29, 1843
Part 1

Woonsocket Patriot
December 29, 1843
Part 2

Woonsocket Patriot
December 29, 1843
Part 3

Woonsocket Patriot
June 21, 1844

New York Daily Tribune
January 8, 1846

Woonsocket Patriot
October 1, 1847

Woonsocket Patriot
October 17, 1847
Part 1

Woonsocket Patriot
October 17, 1847
Part 2

Woonsocket Patriot
October 17, 1847
Part 3

Woonsocket Patriot
October 17, 1847
Part 4

Woonsocket Patriot
October 17, 1847
Part 5

Woonsocket Patriot
October 17, 1847
Part 6

The Daily National Whig
(Washington, D.C.)
October 29, 1847

Air-Line Railroad Schedule
December 24, 1847

Woonsocket Patriot
March 10, 1848

Air-Line Railroad Schedule
August 1, 1851
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Woonsocket Patriot
February 10, 1854
Part 1

Woonsocket Patriot
February 10, 1854
Part 2

Woonsocket Patriot
February 10, 1854
Part 3

Air-Line Railroad Schedule
March 10, 1854

Woonsocket Patriot
May 12, 1854

Woonsocket Patriot
June 30, 1855
Part 1

Woonsocket Patriot
June 30, 1855 Part 2

Woonsocket Patriot
June 30, 1855
Part 3

Woonsocket Weekly Patriot
July 28, 1855
Accident happened July 21st.

Woonsocket Weekly Patriot
August 4, 1855

Rutland (VT.) Weekly Herald
July 14, 1870, Pg. 4

Woonsocket Patriot
June 9, 1871

Woonsocket Patriot
January 8, 1877

Morning Journal & Courier
(New Haven, CT.)
September 4, 1886

The Evening Bulletin
Maysville, KY.
January 19, 1893

Evening Bulletin
Maysville, KY.
January 19, 1893

Evening Bulletin
(Maysville KY.)
January 19, 1893

Evening Bulletin
(Maysville, KY.)
January 19, 1893

Moving The Smithfield Railroad Station – 1975

Moving The Smithfield Railroad Station – February 2, 1975

     The Smithfield Station was located on Brayton Avenue just in the from the intersection of Farnum Pike, (Rt. 104).  It was one of four stations in Smithfield that were built in the 1870s as part of the Providence & Springfield Railroad.   Passenger service to Smithfield ended in 1931, and the station fell into disrepair.  In February 2, 1975, members of the Historical Society of Smithfield brought the old station to the Smith-Appleby House.  There it sat for almost five years before being taken to the Davies Technical School in Lincoln where it underwent restoration.  It was then brought back to the Smith-Appleby House and placed on a granite foundation where it sits today on permanent display.   

     To learn more click here: Smithfield’s Woonasquatucket Railroad and here: Woonasquatucket Railroad Newspaper Articles

 

Click on images to enlarge.

The train station after restoration.

The train station after restoration.

 

Woonasquatucket Railroad Newspaper Articles – 1870s

Articles from the Woonsocket Patriot newspaper.

     The Woonasquatucket Railroad was chartered in 1857, but due to financial setbacks and the American Civil War, work wasn’t begun until 1871.  In 1872 the name was changed to the Providence & Springfield Railroad.  It later became the New York & New England Railroad in 1890, and in 1895, the New England Railroad.  The name was changed again in 1898 to the New York & New Haven Railroad.

     Passenger service to the Smithfield portion of tracks was discontinued in 1931, and the tracks were torn up in 1962.

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Woonsocket Patriot

February 18, 1870

Woonsocket Patriot

November 24, 1871

Woonsocket Patriot

March 15, 1872

Woonsocket Patriot

April 5, 1872

Woonsocket Patriot

April 12, 1872

Woonsocket Patriot

April 19, 1872

Woonsocket Patriot

June 28, 1872

Woonsocket Patriot

August 16, 1872

Woonsocket Patriot

July 19, 1872

Woonsocket Patriot

September 6, 1872

Woonsocket Patriot

October 4, 1872

Woonsocket Patriot

November 15, 1872

Woonsocket Patriot

November 28, 1872

Woonsocket Patriot

December 6, 1872

Woonsocket Patriot January 24, 1873

Woonsocket Patriot

February 21, 1873

Woonsocket Patriot

March 7, 1873

Woonsocket Patriot

May 2, 1873

Woonsocket Patriot

May 23, 1873

Woonsocket Patriot

August 15, 1873

Woonsocket Patriot

August 22, 1873

Woonsocket Patriot

May 22, 1874

Woonsocket Patriot
December 25, 1874

Woonsocket Patriot
January 29, 1875

Woonsocket Patriot January 29, 1875

Woonsocket Patriot
April 30, 1875

Woonsocket Patriot
February 4, 1876

Woonsocket Patriot
February 4, 1876

Woonsocket Patriot
October 27, 1876

Woonsocket Patriot
December 27, 1878

     Other known railroad accidents that have occurred on the Smithfield portion include the following:

     On August 14, 1888, a 55-year-old man was struck and killed by a moving train.  The exact location is not recorded.

     On May 16, 1924, a 37-year-old man was killed when he fell under a moving train in Stillwater.

    On April 14, 1925, an automobile containing a man and three women was struck by a train at the Brayton Avenue crossing.  All four were killed.

     On November 30, 1928, a husband and wife were injured when their automobile collided with a train at the Brayton Avenue crossing.

     On September 18, 1945, an automobile was struck by a train at the “Bull Run” crossing at Farnum Pike and Leland Mowry Rd.  One person was killed and six others were injured.

     On September 28, 1955, one man was killed when his car collided with a train that was crossing Douglas Pike near the North Smithfield town line.      

 

Railroad Accident – 1878

 

Woonsocket Patriot
December 27, 1878

Railroad Accident – 1835

 

Woonsocket Patriot
June 27, 1835

Railroad Accident – July 21, 1855

     At the time of this accident, Lonsdale was still part of Smithfield.

Woonsocket Patriot
July 28, 1855

Railroad Accident – July 27, 1855

Click on images to enlarge.

Article appeared in the Woonsocket Patriot, July 28, 1855, page 4.

Woonsocket Patriot
July 28, 1855, pg. 4

Woonsocket Patriot
July 28, 1855

Providence & Worcester Railroad Schedules – 1840s/50s

     These schedules pertain to the “Air-line” railroad that once ran through Smithfield, R. I.  To learn more, click here:  Smithfield’s Air-Line Railroad 

Click on images to enlarge.

Air-Line Railroad Schedule
December 24, 1847

Woonsocket Patriot
January 19, 1849

Woonsocket Patriot
January 19, 1849

Air-Line Railroad Schedule
August 1, 1851
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Air-Line Railroad Schedule
March 10, 1854

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Woonsocket Patriot
May 22, 1855

Smithfield’s Woonasquatucket Railroad

     Originally published in the Smithfield Times, April, 2018

Smithfield’s Woonasquatucket Railroad

By Jim Ignasher

 

A locomotive of the type that once ran through Smithfield in the late 1800s.

  In the February issue I wrote about Smithfield’s Air-Line R.R. This month’s article is about another rail line that has long since disappeared.      

     If someone today were to propose the construction of a railroad through Smithfield, they would likely face strong opposition. The town hall would be inundated with residents demanding the tracks be laid elsewhere, and not through their “back yard”. Yet one might be surprised to learn that there was a time when just the opposite was true, and the citizens of Smithfield eagerly awaited the construction of a new railroad.

     After the division of the town in 1871, Smithfield, as we know it today, was left without a railroad. However, there were those who hoped to remedy the situation by reviving the charter for the Woonasquatucket Railroad Company. The charter had originally been granted in 1857, with a plan to lay tracks that more or less followed the Woonasquatucket River from Providence to Massachusetts. Unfortunately, financial setbacks, followed by the onset of the American Civil War delayed the project for nearly fifteen years.

     In 1871 the idea was revisited and planning of the route was begun. Although everyone agreed that a rail line would be good for the town, there was much debate as to exactly where the rails should be laid, for every mill owner and farmer wanted the trains to pass as close as to their property as possible. It was finally announced that the proposed route would run through the villages of Esmond, Georgiaville, and Stillwater, and then continue on into North Smithfield, and Burrillville, which was good news to some, but not for Greenville.  

     On November 20, 1871, a meeting was held at Tobey’s Store in Greenville to discuss the possibility of constructing a branch line that would run from Stillwater to Greenville. If it proved successful, the branch line would later be extended to North Scituate and Chepachet. The meeting was well attended, and efforts to have the branch-line constructed continued for several years, but history has shown that it was never built.

     By the spring of 1872 construction on the main line was begun, but sometime between March and June the name of the railroad was changed to the Providence and Springfield Railroad. The project moved quickly, and on August 11, 1873, the line was open for business.

     Smithfield had four railroad stations: the Esmond Station located behind the Esmond Mills; the Georgiaville Station, located on Station Street; the Stillwater Station, located on Capron Road; and the Smithfield Station, located on Brayton Road just to the east from Farnum Pike. The stations became social centers where people could catch up on the latest news, mail a letter, or ride to Providence in less time then it took to ride a horse from one side of Smithfield to the other.  

     By 1878, the Providence & Springfield R.R. was running three locomotives, three passenger cars, and seventy-seven freight cars along the Smithfield route.

     During the 1890s the rail line changed hands three times; to the New York & New England Railroad in 1890, to The New England Railroad in 1895, to the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad in 1898.

     The railroad had a great economic influence on the town as it allowed business owners and farmers to transport more goods to other markets than ever before, and at a lower price. It even played a part in World War I by transporting Esmond Mill army blankets destined for troops overseas.

     Unfortunately, just as rail lines eclipsed the horse-drawn stage coaches, improvements in roadways and automobile technology eventually eclipsed the “iron horses” of the rails. Passenger service along the Smithfield route was discontinued in 1931, and in 1962 the tracks that ran from Olneyville to Pascoag were abandoned and eventually removed. The only surviving rails known to exist were found under the asphalt of Esmond Street during road construction several years ago. Today they can be viewed at the Smith-Appleby House Museum next to the restored Smithfield Station.    

     As with all rail lines of the time, the Smithfield portion experienced its share of accidents. At a town meeting held on January 29, 1876, local citizens cited several instances of narrow escapes at rail crossings in town, and urged the Town Council to force the railroad to use flagmen. The council, however, didn’t have the legal authority to do so.

     The first known accident to occur along the Smithfield portion happened on Christmas Eve in 1878 when a wagon was struck broadside by a speeding train at the Brayton Road crossing. The driver survived, but his horse did not.

     According to town records, the first railroad fatality in town occurred in 1888 when a man was struck by a passing train. The exact location isn’t given.

     One of the more notable accidents involved a head-on collision between two trains on June 12, 1894 in the area of what is today the Stillwater Scenic Walking Trail. Ten people were seriously injured. The crash was blamed on human error.

     The Brayton Crossing was reputed to be one of the most dangerous for it was frequently traveled by those heading to or from Woonsocket. On April 15, 1925, it was the scene of what might be the worst accident to occur on the rail line. At about 7 p.m., a car carrying seven adults was struck by a southbound train. One man and three women were killed, and the others were severely injured.    

     Three years later on November 30, 1928, yet another accident occurred at the Brayton Crossing in which a husband and wife were injured when a train collided with their car.

     Other accidents are documented, but space does not permit their inclusion here.

     Until recently, it was thought that Smithfield’s only surviving train station was the Smithfield Station presently located at the Smith-Appleby House. However, recent information has come to light that Esmond may have had two railroad stations; a smaller one that was replaced by a larger one. The smaller one is indicated on early maps, and may possibly have been sold to a private party and relocated to Farnum Pike in Georgiaville. Research to confirm this continues.      

For more info click here: Moving The Smithfield Railroad Station – 1975  and here: Woonasquatucket R. R. Newspaper Articles

 

 

 

 

 

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